Both my cars were involved in a hit and run. I have full coverage, will my insurance pay?

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Asked July 13, 2010

1 Answer


"Full" coverage is not the same as "complete" coverage. This situation seems to call for uninsured motorist coverage, since you do not know who the driver was who caused the damage to both cars. Alternately, collision coverage would apply to the situation. These types of coverage are required in some states, but most areas have them as optional coverage which you have to add to the state's minimum coverage.

Uninsured / underinsured motorist coverage is generally applied to hit and run accidents. No-fault coverage would also be applied, since it effectively does the same thing: covers damage to your vehicle if you cannot identify the person responsible, or if that person does not sufficient coverage. The third coverage term which could be used in your scenario is collision coverage, which includes hit and run accidents or any other situation in which damage is sustained when your vehicle is struck or caused to strike another object.

The key factor is whether you have the necessary coverage for both vehicles. If only one vehicle is covered with collision insurance of some type, then only that one vehicle will be covered, if neither vehicle has such coverage, then you will have to pay the full cost of repair and replacement out of pocket. Keep in mind, too, that such a double claim is extremely rare, and will send up red flags with your insurance company. Before any payout on both vehicles is made, the insurance company will want to have a copy of the police report and other information, and perform an investigation of their own. As long as the claim is legitimate and the cars have the proper insurance plan, you will receive payment for both vehicles.

Answered July 13, 2010 by Anonymous

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