Will a life insurance policy still pay if the claim is for a smoker but in the policy, the person is listed as a non-smoker?

UPDATED: May 12, 2015

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UPDATED: May 12, 2015Fact Checked

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Asked May 12, 2015

1 Answer


When you apply for insurance, one of the questions you will be asked is whether you smoke or not. If you answer yes, you will be asked what you smoke and how frequently. This, among other things, allows the insurance company to determine the risks associated with insuring you, and helps set the premiums you pay.

If you later file a smoking related claim but your insurance applications shows that you are a non-smoker, the insurance company is going to want to know when your habits changed and why they weren't notified. Since the policy was written for a nonsmoker, any smoking related claims are likely to be denied until you can prove that the insurance company is liable for the claim.

Smoking is a very dangerous habit, from the insurance point of view. It can lead to heart and lung disease, several types of cancers, and other disorders such as emphysema. Because smoking increases the risk of serious medical complications, insurance companies charge higher premiums for smokers, compensating for the expected higher medical costs. If you applied for insurance and did not admit that you smoked, your coverage is subject to termination and you could be prosecuted for fraud.

If you have taken up smoking since you were approved for insurance, it is a good idea to make sure that your change in smoking status is added to your file before it becomes a medical claim. Blood tests can be used to determine how often you smoke, and estimate for how long. Once that information is added to your insurance file, you will be insured for future smoking related problems, but you probably see an increase in your premiums in the near future, as your rates increase because of being a smoker.

Answered May 14, 2015 by Anonymous

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